Reclaimed Wood Flower Box Reveal + Sneak Peek of the Sorghum Festival at Tipton-Haynes

A collection of little houses made from reclaimed wood + picture frame moulding samples. Artist SassyHat (Chasidy Hathorn) designs each little house and beach cottage to be fun and happy because we could all use a little more fun and happy in our lives *big smile*

A collection of little houses made from reclaimed wood + picture frame moulding samples. Artist SassyHat (Chasidy Hathorn) designs each little house and beach cottage to be fun and happy because we could all use a little more fun and happy in our lives *big smile*

Hey, y’all! Welcome to Sweet Sorghum Living–a place to sit a spell with a good cup of coffee and enjoy good conversation about everything from art to home renovation. Today on the blog, we are chatting about my love of reclaimed wood + how I use my embarrassingly large collection of it to build not only the little houses that I sell in my Etsy shop, but also for furniture (for my own home and homes I style) + random home projects.

Modern rustic console the hubby built featured with a collection of crosses built from salvaged wood.

Modern rustic console the hubby built from old barn wood featured with a collection of crosses built from salvaged wood.

There is just something about the character of salvaged wood that gets my heart to pounding and the wheels inside my head turning. The holes…the weathered grays and browns…the discolorations from water, oil, inks….Oh, the stories that old barn wood could tell! Oh, the history of old doors and shiplap! Yes,  I totally crush on reclaimed wood, and my basement is full of glorious pieces just waiting to become something new *big smile*

An end table and Tennessee sign the hubby built from wood that we salvaged from an old barn in Washington County, Tennessee. These pieces are currently available at The Local Company in Johnson City.

An end table and Tennessee sign the hubby built from wood we salvaged from an old barn in Washington County, Tennessee. These pieces are currently available at The Local Company in Johnson City, Tennessee.

Now, most of the really super awesome pieces of salvaged wood become furniture or signs; however, for the few pieces that are just a little basic, I use them for random projects around my house. Today’s project reveal is a great example of how the hubby and I take those not-so-glorious pieces and turn them into something pretty wow!

This little corner was in desperate need of some TLC.

This little corner was in desperate need of some TLC.

This reclaimed wood project became a mission–a mission to turn an awkward, ugly space into something usable and attractive using salvaged wood from my basement collection. I had no idea what I wanted to do; however, after a little brainstorming session with the hubby, we came up with a flower box.

The space was already shaped like a rectangle, so why not build a box *wink*

The space was already shaped like a rectangle, so why not build a box *wink*

The hubby built four sides and no bottom because we just used the gravel that was already there as the bottom of our flower box.

The hubby only built four sides because the gravel serves as the bottom of the flower box.

Nothing fancy, but wow! What a difference!

Nothing fancy, but wow! Boring space now has a bit of interest *big smile*

Sometimes, projects can be simple and make a big difference!

Easy, peasy projects can make a big difference!

We used the same stain on the window box as we used to freshen up the floor of the deck.

We used the same stain on the window box as we used to freshen up the floor of the deck.

The hubby staining the simple box. There was no need to build a bottom for our box because the gravel was already in place--which worked out fabulously for drainage!

The hubby staining the simple “box.” There was no need to build a bottom for our box because the gravel was already in place–which worked out fabulously for drainage!

We only stained the part of the inside that might be seen. No need to waste time or stain on something that will never be seen...unless someone decides to dig in the flower box to see if the entire thing is stained, y'all, the hubby, and I are the only ones that know it isn't stained all the way down *wink*

We only stained a small part of the inside because there was no need to waste time or stain on something that would never be seen. Unless someone decides to dig in the flower box to see if the entire thing is stained–y’all, the hubby, and I are the only ones that know it isn’t painted all the way down *wink*

After the stain dried, we added dirt and flowers.

After the stain dried, we added potting soil and pretty pink mandevillas.

More pops of pink and this once-ugly space is now ready for someone to sit a spell with a good cup of coffee!

More pops of pink and this once ugly space is now ready for someone to sit a spell with a good cup of coffee!

Thanks so much for sitting a spell with me today as we chatted about my crush on salvaged wood + how a simple project can take a dull space to a wow space. Now, y’all, come back and visit soon because I will be chatting about this year’s Sorghum Festival at Tipton-Haynes + Mr. C.B. Reese, who was born in 1922 and has seen a lot of changes in this world since he was born!

Here are a few sneak peek photos of the Sorghum Festival + my favorite photo of Mr. C.B. Reese:

Mr. C.B. Reese, born in 1922, has many stories to tell! I would love to sit a spell with him all day *big smile*

Mr. C.B. Reese, 94, has many interesting stories to tell! I would love to sit a spell with him all day *big smile*

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WCYB setting up to chat with Oscar Wagner and C.B. Reese about the importance of the Sorghum Festival.

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I wonder what he is making???? Y’all will have to come back to see *wink*

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Hmmmm, I wonder what these guys are doing???

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Oh, my! What is she cooking up in that iron skillet? Hint: it has sorghum molasses in it.

 

 

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